Pressure Ridge Tour

A few weeks ago, I signed up to take a pressure ridge tour.

Of course the weather turned crappy that day and I wasn’t able to go.

A few days ago, I signed up for another pressure ridge tour.

The weather decided to cooperate this time.

On Sunday, September 22nd, a few of us loaded up in a van and headed over to Scott Base to tour the pressure ridges. For an explanation on what exactly a pressure ridge is, let’s turn to Wikipedia for a moment –

A pressure ridge develops in an ice cover as a result of a stress regime established within the plane of the ice. Within sea ice expanses, pressure ridges originate from the interaction between floes, as they collide with each other. Currents and winds are the main driving forces, but the latter are particularly effective when they have a predominant direction. Pressure ridges are made up of angular ice blocks of various sizes that pile up on the floes. The part of the ridge that is above the water surface is known as the sail; that below it as the keel. Pressure ridges are the thickest sea ice features and account for about one-half of the total sea ice volume.

Thanks, Wikipedia.

We headed over to Scott Base to drop off the van and start our journey. It was just a small group of us, eight in total. As this was listed as a “photography tour”, we all got our cameras ready and started down towards the ice. The last time I walked down that path was when I did the polar plunge in 2012.

We hadn’t been on the ice that long when, all of a sudden, I’m face to face with the ground. I didn’t remember falling. I had leg on the ice behind me, and realized my right leg was down in the ice. I briefly had an “oh crap” moment. I quickly rolled over onto what I hoped was more stable ice and was helped up by one of the guys on our trip, Greg. Both myself and my camera were okay so we continued on our way.

The sky was a gorgeous blue, the sun was shining, and not a cloud was in the sky, until the end of our tour.

It was the perfect day on the ice.

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